Laura Kaminsky, New York-based composer of contemporary chamber, vocal, and orchestral music, with social-political topics like environment and war

Selected Reviews of Kaminsky’s Works

The highlight of the evening was undoubtedly Laura Kaminsky’s “Homage to Havel,” a tribute to the Czech Republic’s first president, Václav Havel. Kaminsky is a skilled composer who fully understands the capabilities and strengths of each instrument, combining sounds in a way that is both intriguing and unique. Her thought-provoking piece was electrifying throughout and Cygnus performed it with energetic confidence. – Feast of Music


Laura Kaminsky‘s strikingly intense diptych, Deception (with clarinetist Moran) Katz’s moody, richly burnished low register in tandem with the cello built an air of mystery and foreboding, occasionally punctured by the piano. The second movement worked clever variations via individual voices in a very Debussy-esque arrangement that also offered a nod to Shostakovich and possibly Penderecki as well.” – Lucid Culture


Kaminsky’s musical language is compounded of hymns, blues, and gestures not unlike those of Shostakovich.” – inTune


Kaminsky creates soft, evocative moods as naturally as she writes music that moves with force.” – New Music Connoisseur


Ms. Kaminsky’s substantial duo, ‘Interpolations on Utopia Parkway,’ reflected her contact with life in Africa, where the sense of how events move through time is so different from ours, and her piece engaged the listener in an unusual manner.” – New Music Connoisseur


Not only a tone poem of nature at day’s end, Twilight Settings also depicts a world where twilight, and the inevitable darkness which follows, are harbingers of death. The music is very spare and evocative; traces of gamelan flicker in the percussion ostinatos, and some folkish triads — especially in the opening and closing songs — warm the soprano lines. The work ends effectively and beautifully.” – American Music


A Dream Revisited for amplified flute and percussion is delicate and imaginative.” – The New Yorker


I was strongly drawn to [a] more serious work that uses dialogue as [its] main dramatic structure. In Laura Kaminsky’s Until A Name, based on Conversation by Elizabeth Bishop, the exchange is between rapid passage work and evocative long tones. Fascinated by the awareness of the breath within the sustained tones, I became a participant in the drama rather than an onlooker. Terri Sundberg’s playing is especially expressive at the climactic moment of stillness when a series of repeated notes begins the work’s denouement into a dissonant silence.” – New Music Connoisseur


A composer with an ear for the new and interesting [whose work is] colorful and harmonically sharp edged.” – The New York Times